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Why did Facebook change its name to Meta? It will be Meta Platforms Inc. Zuckerberg's parent company Facebook, WhatsApp, Instagram, and other platforms. Mark Zuckerberg often says that when he started Facebook in a Harvard dorm, he could not have foreseen the impact the social network would eventually have. So it was bound to make some mistakes in his story. They certainly did. Pushing the company toward a "metaverse," as Zuckerberg calls his own vision of the augmented and virtual worlds, is thus an opportunity to remake. Creating a new product from scratch should allow you to fix Facebook 1.0 bugs. In 2004, Zuckerberg did not know that his product would have the scale to subvert democracy. Now he does. With the renovation, of course, comes a new name, too. Facebook Inc. , the parent company of Instagram, WhatsApp, and the blue app of the same name, no longer exists. From now on, it will be known as Meta Platforms Inc. It unleashes the toxic shackles associated with the Facebook brand, its mishandling of extremist content, hate speech and misinformation, and a reputation for quick and easy gameplay with users' personal data. Zuckerberg's presentation on Thursday, where he revealed his vision of metaverses along with the new name, was more from Elon Musk than from Steve Jobs. While Jobs kept details of new products a secret until they were ready to be manufactured and sold, Musk is more inclined to showcase the ideas and innovations he plans to achieve one day. Zook also seems to be making more of a statement than an actual product. But there were also hints that despite all the great presentations, it's still the same old Facebook. The most revealing comment came from Vishal Shah, metaverse's product manager, who said companies and creators "will sell digital and physical goods, as well as experiences and services, and be able to use advertising to ensure the right customers find what they've created." Therefore, advertising will continue to be a business model. In the metaverse, that can be incredibly creepy. Right now, Facebook has amazing data on what catches your eye: how long you stay in an Instagram photo of a slimly dressed model, how often you click on ads for a hair loss treatment, if that's more. You will likely see a video from The Daily Show or OAN. If you're wearing a virtual reality headset, the Facebook Meta can literally track your eyes to see what you're looking at, or measure your facial expressions to recreate them on your avatar. How much of this data will the company record, and most importantly, keep it? If you choose not to participate, will they actually delete this data or keep it anonymous, as is the case with some companies today? Last year, Facebook unveiled its "Principles for Responsible Innovation" which included "transparency about how and when data is collected, and how it is used over time so that people are not surprised." Nick Clegg, Meta's head of public affairs and communications, spoke about the issue on Thursday, saying it will take a long time to create the equation that regulators will have plenty of time to catch up with. But the company still needs to earn the trust of its users. This will be especially important if the Meta is to succeed due to changes in the competitive landscape. For the first time, the five US tech giants will compete directly: Amazon.com, Apple, Microsoft and Alphabet's Google to develop augmented and virtual reality products. And the richest, Apple, has made user privacy and security a key element in differentiating products. Right now, Facebook is making a game for Apple's wealthy developer community, promising better terms than Apple and Google are currently offering, which likely means lower equity in their app stores. But Apple has built a better reputation for user safety. Zuckerberg himself admitted this week that these principles need to be emphasized early on. Despite all your talk of a single "metaverse", the reality is likely to be a series of competing metaverses, running on different hardware and software architectures. If it's going to win the metaverse platform wars, the Meta needs to change more than just its name.

 Why did Facebook change its name to Meta?

Why did Facebook change its name to Meta?       It will be Meta Platforms Inc.  Zuckerberg's parent company Facebook, WhatsApp, Instagram, and other platforms.     Mark Zuckerberg often says that when he started Facebook in a Harvard dorm, he could not have foreseen the impact the social network would eventually have.  So it was bound to make some mistakes in his story.  They certainly did.    Pushing the company toward a "metaverse," as Zuckerberg calls his own vision of the augmented and virtual worlds, is thus an opportunity to remake.  Creating a new product from scratch should allow you to fix Facebook 1.0 bugs.    In 2004, Zuckerberg did not know that his product would have the scale to subvert democracy.  Now he does.    With the renovation, of course, comes a new name, too.  Facebook Inc.  , the parent company of Instagram, WhatsApp, and the blue app of the same name, no longer exists.  From now on, it will be known as Meta Platforms Inc.  It unleashes the toxic shackles associated with the Facebook brand, its mishandling of extremist content, hate speech and misinformation, and a reputation for quick and easy gameplay with users' personal data.    Zuckerberg's presentation on Thursday, where he revealed his vision of metaverses along with the new name, was more from Elon Musk than from Steve Jobs.  While Jobs kept details of new products a secret until they were ready to be manufactured and sold, Musk is more inclined to showcase the ideas and innovations he plans to achieve one day.  Zook also seems to be making more of a statement than an actual product.    But there were also hints that despite all the great presentations, it's still the same old Facebook.  The most revealing comment came from Vishal Shah, metaverse's product manager, who said companies and creators "will sell digital and physical goods, as well as experiences and services, and be able to use advertising to ensure the right customers find what they've created."    Therefore, advertising will continue to be a business model.  In the metaverse, that can be incredibly creepy.  Right now, Facebook has amazing data on what catches your eye: how long you stay in an Instagram photo of a slimly dressed model, how often you click on ads for a hair loss treatment, if that's more.  You will likely see a video from The Daily Show or OAN.  If you're wearing a virtual reality headset, the Facebook Meta can literally track your eyes to see what you're looking at, or measure your facial expressions to recreate them on your avatar.  How much of this data will the company record, and most importantly, keep it?  If you choose not to participate, will they actually delete this data or keep it anonymous, as is the case with some companies today?    Last year, Facebook unveiled its "Principles for Responsible Innovation" which included "transparency about how and when data is collected, and how it is used over time so that people are not surprised."  Nick Clegg, Meta's head of public affairs and communications, spoke about the issue on Thursday, saying it will take a long time to create the equation that regulators will have plenty of time to catch up with.  But the company still needs to earn the trust of its users.    This will be especially important if the Meta is to succeed due to changes in the competitive landscape.  For the first time, the five US tech giants will compete directly: Amazon.com, Apple, Microsoft and Alphabet's Google to develop augmented and virtual reality products.    And the richest, Apple, has made user privacy and security a key element in differentiating products.  Right now, Facebook is making a game for Apple's wealthy developer community, promising better terms than Apple and Google are currently offering, which likely means lower equity in their app stores.  But Apple has built a better reputation for user safety.  Zuckerberg himself admitted this week that these principles need to be emphasized early on.    Despite all your talk of a single "metaverse", the reality is likely to be a series of competing metaverses, running on different hardware and software architectures.  If it's going to win the metaverse platform wars, the Meta needs to change more than just its name.


  It will be Meta Platforms Inc.  Zuckerberg's parent company Facebook, WhatsApp, Instagram, and other platforms.



  Mark Zuckerberg often says that when he started Facebook in a Harvard dorm, he could not have foreseen the impact the social network would eventually have.  So it was bound to make some mistakes in his story.  They certainly did.


  Pushing the company toward a "metaverse," as Zuckerberg calls his own vision of the augmented and virtual worlds, is thus an opportunity to remake.  Creating a new product from scratch should allow you to fix Facebook 1.0 bugs.


  In 2004, Zuckerberg did not know that his product would have the scale to subvert democracy.  Now he does.


  With the renovation, of course, comes a new name, too.  Facebook Inc.  , the parent company of Instagram, WhatsApp, and the blue app of the same name, no longer exists.  From now on, it will be known as Meta Platforms Inc.  It unleashes the toxic shackles associated with the Facebook brand, its mishandling of extremist content, hate speech and misinformation, and a reputation for quick and easy gameplay with users' personal data.


  Zuckerberg's presentation on Thursday, where he revealed his vision of metaverses along with the new name, was more from Elon Musk than from Steve Jobs.  While Jobs kept details of new products a secret until they were ready to be manufactured and sold, Musk is more inclined to showcase the ideas and innovations he plans to achieve one day.  Zook also seems to be making more of a statement than an actual product.


  But there were also hints that despite all the great presentations, it's still the same old Facebook.  The most revealing comment came from Vishal Shah, metaverse's product manager, who said companies and creators "will sell digital and physical goods, as well as experiences and services, and be able to use advertising to ensure the right customers find what they've created."


  Therefore, advertising will continue to be a business model.  In the metaverse, that can be incredibly creepy.  Right now, Facebook has amazing data on what catches your eye: how long you stay in an Instagram photo of a slimly dressed model, how often you click on ads for a hair loss treatment, if that's more.  You will likely see a video from The Daily Show or OAN.  If you're wearing a virtual reality headset, the Facebook Meta can literally track your eyes to see what you're looking at, or measure your facial expressions to recreate them on your avatar.  How much of this data will the company record, and most importantly, keep it?  If you choose not to participate, will they actually delete this data or keep it anonymous, as is the case with some companies today?


  Last year, Facebook unveiled its "Principles for Responsible Innovation" which included "transparency about how and when data is collected, and how it is used over time so that people are not surprised."  Nick Clegg, Meta's head of public affairs and communications, spoke about the issue on Thursday, saying it will take a long time to create the equation that regulators will have plenty of time to catch up with.  But the company still needs to earn the trust of its users.


  This will be especially important if the Meta is to succeed due to changes in the competitive landscape.  For the first time, the five US tech giants will compete directly: Amazon.com, Apple, Microsoft and Alphabet's Google to develop augmented and virtual reality products.


  And the richest, Apple, has made user privacy and security a key element in differentiating products.  Right now, Facebook is making a game for Apple's wealthy developer community, promising better terms than Apple and Google are currently offering, which likely means lower equity in their app stores.  But Apple has built a better reputation for user safety.  Zuckerberg himself admitted this week that these principles need to be emphasized early on.


  Despite all your talk of a single "metaverse", the reality is likely to be a series of competing metaverses, running on different hardware and software architectures.  If it's going to win the metaverse platform wars, the Meta needs to change more than just its name.

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